Connersville Veterinary Clinic

808 East County Road 250S
Connersville, IN 47331

(765)825-9620

www.connersvillevetclinic.com

Vaccinations for your Pets


Recommended K9 Vaccinations

Rabies
   - Rabies is a Virus that can affect the Brain and Spinal Cord of all mammals, including dogs, cats, and humans.  It is primarily passed to dogs and cats through a bite from an infected animal.
   - Vaccination is required by state law and has to be given by a vet.

Distemper
   - Distemper is a Virus in dogs that can affect a wide range of organs including the skin, brain, eyes, intestinal and respiratory tracts.
   - Common Clinical signs are nasal and eye discharge , coughing, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and seizures.
   - Distemper is transmitted through the air when an infected animal coughs and it is also transmitted through bodily secretions.
   - Puppies less than 6 months of age are the most susceptible, however a dog at any age can become infected.

Parvovirus
   - Parvovirus affects a dogs Gastrointestinal tract and is spread by direct dog-to-dog contact and contact with contaminated stool, environments, or people.
   -  Some common signs or Parvo infection are:
                  - Lethargy
                  - Loss of Appetite
                  - Vomiting
                  - Severe and often Bloody Diarrhea
                  - Fever
   - The Parvovirus is resistant to heat, cold, humidity, and drying.  It can survive in the environment for long periods of time. 

Kennel Cough
   - Your dog is at an increased risk of contracting Kennel Cough when they go to dog parks, boarding facilities, and groom facilities. 
   - Kennel Cough is a contagious, bacterial infection that is passed from dog to dog when they inhale the bacteria into their respiratory tract.  It causes inflammation of the larynx and trachea which in turn produces a cough.

Leptospirosis
   - Leptospirosis is a bacteria that infects most mammals, including people (Zoonotic disease).  It causes fever, depression, joint pain, and it can also cause kidney and liver failure.
   - Lepto is transmitted through urine, bite wounds, and eating infected materials.
   - Leptospira can be washed by rain into standing water.  Pets then wade, swim in, or drink the contaminated water and develop the disease.

Adenovirus
   - This virus spreads directly from dog to dog through infected respiratory secretions or by contact with contaminated feces or urine.
   - Common symptoms include a dry, hacking cough, coughing up white, foamy discharge, and conjunctivitis.


Parvovirus

Parvovirus is a highly contagious disease that can infect all dogs.  Unvaccinated dogs, and puppies that are younger then 4 months old are most susceptible.  The virus affects that dogs gastrointenstinal tract and is spread by direct dog-to-dog contact and contact with contaminated stool, environments, or people.  Infected dogs should be isolated to help prevent the spread of infection.  Vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration.  Most parvo related deaths occur within 48-72 hours following the onset signs.

The incubation period for Parvo is 3-7 days.  Signs and symptoms may include Lethargy, Loss of Appetite, Vomiting, and Severe, often Bloody Diarrhea.  Your pet can shed the virus in their feces and vomit for 2-3 weeks post infection.  The Parvovirus is resistant to heat, cold, humidity, and drying.  It can survive in the environment for long periods of time.  Even trace amounts of stool containing Parvo may infect other dogs that come into the infected area.

Unfortunately there is no specific drug that is available to kill the virus in infected dogs.  Treatment consists of IV Fluid administration along with injectable medications to help control the vomiting and diarrhea.  The best way to prevent parvo is through good hygiene and vaccination.  Make sure to get your puppies vaccinated and that your adult dogs are kept up to date on their parvo vaccinations.  A vaccination is available to help protect puppies and dogs.  Puppies should receive 3 parvo vaccinations, 3 weeks apart, starting at 6 weeks of age.


Vaccinations for Cats

Rabies
   - Rabies is a virus that can affect the Brain and spinal cord of all mammals including dogs, cats and humans.  It is primarily passed to dogs and cats through a bite from an infected animal.  It is required by state law and has to be given by a Veterinarian.

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV)
   - Feline Leukemia is a virus that is contagious amongst cats.  Kittens are much more susceptible to infection than adult cats.  Feline Leukemia virus adversely affects the cats body in many ways. You may notice Loss of appetite, slow but progressive weight loss, poor coat conditions, enlarged lymph nodes, persistant fever, pale gums, inflammation of gums and mouth, infections of the skin, bladder, respiratory tract, persistent diarrhea, seizures and behavior changes, and a variety of eye changes.  Feline Leukemia can be transmitted by Bite wounds, saliva, and also through birth (through the uterus of an infected mother).  

Feline Calicivirus
   - This virus is highly contagious.  It attack the respiratory tract, the mouth, the intestines and the musculoskeletal system in cats.  Calicivirus can occur in cats of any age, but young kittens are most susceptible.  You may notice Loss of appetite, eye and nasal discharge, ulcers on tongue and in mouth, pneumonia, arthritis, lameness, and fever.  Calicivirus is spread by direct contact with infected cats or environmental exposure.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR)
   - Rhinotracheitis is a major cause of upper respiratory disease in cats.  FVR is the most common cause of conjuctivitis (inflammation of tissue surrounding the eye).  It is spread by direct contact with the virus.  It is excreted in the saliva and in discharge from the eyes and nose of an infected cat.  You may notice snezzing, nasal congestion, conjunctivitis (red tissue around the eyes), and discharge from the eyes and nose.

Feline Panleukopenia
   - This virus is not only highly contagious, but it is often fatal as well.  Panleukopenia is closely related to canine parvovirus that affects dogs and can also be fatal.  You may notice depression, vomiting, dehydration, and abdominal pain.  Cats can become infected by oral and nasal exposure to infected animals, their feces, secretions, or any object contaminated by their bodily secretions.


Lymes Disease

Lymes disease is a bacterial infection that can affect humans, dogs, cats, and other mammals.  Its primary carrier is the deer tick.  Lymes disease is most often effectively treated with antibiotics.  With prompt, proper treatment, your pets condition should start to improve within 48 hours.  There is a vaccination for Lymes disease that can help protect your pet.  If your dog has never been vaccinated, they will need a booster in 3 weeks following the first vaccination.  

Clinical signs of Lymes Disease include depression, swelling of lymph nodes, loss of appetite, fever, lameness, and swollen, painful joints.  Renal failure may also occur.